The problems of Richard III’s Y chromosome

The problems of Richard III’s Y chromosome; the problems relating to the burials at Clare Priory, and the problems of working with Historic England

In 2004, following the request of colleagues in Belgium, I discovered the mtDNA sequence of King Richard III and his siblings. Mitochondrial DNA is inherited only in the all-female line. In that same year I was commissioned by the BBC to research the ‘body in the river’ story which was then widely recounted in Leicester regarding the fate of Richard III’s remains. As a result of my research on that story, in 2005, with the help of the Richard III Society East Midland (Leicester) Branch, I persuaded Leicester City Council to allow the erection of a new plaque next to the Victorian plaque near Bow Bridge, which commemorates the ‘body in the river’ myth. My new plaque stated that the nineteenth-century inscription of the Victorian memorial was untrue.

Read more http://nerdalicious.com.au/history/the-problems-of-richard-iiis-y-chromosome-the-problems-relating-to-the-burials-at-clare-priory-and-the-problems-of-working-with-historic-england/

Finding the Mitochondrial DNA of King Richard III

In 1468, Margaret of York, the sister of king Edward IV and of Richard, Duke of Gloucester – the future Richard III - married Charles the Bold, Duke of Burgundy. Apart from one brief visit to England, Margaret subsequently spent the rest of her life in Burgundy and Flanders. She endeared herself to her new people both by her kindness, and by her willingness to speak their languages, French and Dutch. She is, to this day, remembered with affection in modern Belgium, and the modern Belgian interest in Margaret of York is an important part of this story.

When her husband left her a childless widow, still relatively young, Margaret settled at the palace in her dower town of Mechelen (or Malines). Here she presided over the upbringing of her step-daughter, Mary of Burgundy, and later of Mary’s children and grandchildren. Only one wing of Margaret's Mechelen Palace survives today. But happily this surviving wing has recently been restored.

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Interview with Richard Armitage

Excerpt:

One of my most important and original contributions has been my work on Richard III’s DNA. This arose out of the need to identify some remains in Belgium which were thought to be those of Richard’s sister, Margaret of York. As a historian and a writer I try always to be clear about what the evidence shows, and about what we know or don’t know. When we DON’T KNOW, but have to draw our own conclusions I try to tell my readers that this is what I am doing, and to explain where I am coming from. Too many historians, past and present, have misleadingly pretended to KNOW things which are really only their personal opinion, and to my mind this is not honest.

Read the whole interview here

Source: http://kingrichardarmitage.rgcwp.com/2011/...

Lost in Castles interview

Excerpt:

The University seems to have simply taken the whole project over, and tried to claim all the credit for everything. I can't understand why. After all, I have no difficulty at all in acknowledging and praising the valuable work which really was done by their archaeologists, osteologists and geneticists. So why do they seem to have such a problem with acknowledging my nine or ten years of preparatory research? Yet the fact is that they appear to have deliberately tried to write me (and others) out of the story. When you look at the history of the project,the university only became involved in 2011. But the project really started in 2003, when I began the search for Richard III's DNA.

Read the whole interview here

Source: http://www.lostincastles.com/history-inter...